HANDSOME SET OF FRENCH ROAD MAPS

 

$1,800

INQUIRE ABOUT THIS ITEM HOW TO ORDER

AUTHOR:

LATTRE, JEAN

TITLE:

Le Voyageur Curieux; ou, Vues des Routes de France / Route de Paris a Compiegne

CONDITION:

First edition. Engraved title, dedication leaf, and seven maps, each measuring 9 3/8” x 5 7/8”. Maps with original hand color. Bound in original blue patterned wrappers. Some minor worming and other signs of age, but overall a very good example of this scarce 18th century route map.

DATE:

c.1770

DESCRIPTION:

Rare; not in OCLC. A handsome bound set of seven very finely-engraved, hand-colored maps showing the route from Paris to Compiègne. The maps were issued by Jean Lattre, “Graveur Ordinaire du Roi,” one of the leading Parisian engravers and publishers of the period. The seven maps that make up this charming guide are highly detailed, showing topographical features, cities and villages, estates, churches, streams, forests, etc. They were drawn to be looked at from various angles, with text facing in more than one direction. The palace at Compiègne, located halfway between Picardy and Paris, was one of the favorite summer residences of the French monarchs. Louis XIV stayed there a reported 75 times, and it became a traditional stopping point during coronation ceremonies on the return from Rheims. The 18th-century courtier, the Comte de Chevergny, described Louis XV's infatuation with the place with the following words: “Hunting was his main passion [...] And Compiègne, with its immense forest, with its endless avenues amongst the trees, with its stretches down which you could ride all day and never come to the end, was the ideal place to indulge that passion.” Although the palace would suffer damages during the Revolution, it was to return to its glory under Napoleon when it was transformed into an imperial residence which rivalled both Versailles and Fontainebleau. In the 20th century, the Compiègne Forest was the site of the signing of two armistices; the 1918 Armistice with Germany and the 1940 Armistice with France. Hitler specifically chose the location, and had the original signing carriage moved from Paris to Compiègne, as an irony for the defeated French.

REFERENCES:

Not in OCLC; the French Union Catalogue locates one copy, but under a different publisher and bound with a contemporary French guide book; Tooley’s Dictionary of Mapmakers, Revised Edition, Volume III, p. 94.

Inventory No. 7628

Cohen & Taliaferro

*indicates required

Receive copies of our printed catalogs in the mail several times each year (U.S. residents only) and/or email updates to our on-line catalog every few weeks.

Cohen & Taliaferro LLC never sells, trades or gives away information from our mailing lists.

() -