ONE OF THE LARGEST EARLY MAPS OF IRELAND

 

$2,800

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AUTHOR:

ROCQUE, JOHN

TITLE:

A Map of the Kingdom of Ireland, Divided into Provinces Counties and Baronies, Shewing The Archbishopricks, Bishopricks, Cities, Boroughs, Market Towns, Barracks, Mountains, Lakes, Bogs, Rivers, Bridges, Ferries, Passes, also the Great, the Branch, & the By Post Roads, together with the Inland Navigation &c. by J: Rocque Chorographer to His Majesty. London, Printed for Robt. Sayer opposite Fetter Lane Fleet Street

CONDITION:

Four unjoined copper-engraved folio sheets that when assembled form one 47” x 39-1/2”. wall map. Period outline color. Fine condition.

DATE:

[c.1760-1773]

DESCRIPTION:

With just two exceptions, this is the largest map for Ireland published to its time. Quite handsome and as the title would suggest, extremely detailed, it is the best source for mid-eighteenth century Ireland. The title cartouche consists of a ruined wall flanked by the remains of pilasters. In front of the wall are two cows and a reclining nude woman. On the lower right sheet is a coastal chart of the British Isles, a box that contains general information on Ireland, and another with a key identifying thirteen features by symbol.

John Rocque was one of the leading mapmakers working in London in the mid-eighteenth century. In 1751 he was appointed cartographer to Frederick, Prince of Wales. Rocque is most famous for his 24-sheet map of London, 1746, and his
Set of Plans and Forts in America, published posthumously in 1765. In 1756 he published a four-sheet plan of Dublin that appears on the Irish ten pound bank note.

This is Bonar Law’s second state of three of Rocque’s four-sheet map of Ireland.. An advertisement in
Faulkners Journal for December 1759 demonstrates that the map was originally published shortly after that date. But Bonar Law was apparently unable to locate any example of this first state, with Roque styled “Chorographer to the Prince of Wales.” Bonar Law suggests that “few of the early separate maps have survived,” and is uncertain whether Sayer’s address appeared on the first state or was added with the second, when the imprint was altered to read “Chorographer to His Majesty.”

At any rate, this example has the earliest of the six addresses for Sayer found on copies of the map (with the words “Fetter Lane”). Bonar Law considers all known copies with Sayer’s name, irrespective of the address, to be second state. A third state was published by Laurie and Whittle.

REFERENCES:

Bonar Law, The Printed Maps of Ireland, 1612-1850, 93 (ii)

Inventory No. 8589

Cohen & Taliaferro

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