A LANDMARK MAP FOR THE AMERICAN WEST AND TEXAS

 

$7,500

INQUIRE ABOUT THIS ITEM HOW TO ORDER

AUTHOR:

BRUE, A. H.

TITLE:

Carte du Mexique, du Texas.

CONDITION:

Copper-engraving with period hand color, 36-3/4” x 24-3/4” . Fine condition.

DATE:

Paris, [1834-]

DESCRIPTION:

The second edition of the earliest general map of the west to incorporate information from the greatest of all the fur traders, Jedidiah Smith. Wheat proclaims that “Smith’s great service to geographical and cartographical knowledge [was] to tie together the worlds of Escalante and Miera, on the one hand, and of Lewis and Clark on the other, locking them firmly together by a brilliant feat of exploration and applied intelligence.” Among his achievements he blazed the southwestern trail to California, was the first man of European stock to cross the Sierra Nevadas, and effectively discovered the South Pass.

Smith’s lost manuscripts were never published, but through an 1827 letter from Smith published in Paris, word of his exploits reached Brue, and were recorded for the first time on the firm’s 1833 map of North America and 1834 Mexico. (No map published in the United States included Smith information until David Burr’s 1839
Map of the United States.) Brue includes Smith’s 1826 route from San Diego to the Salt Lake. In what is now Nevada, Brue locates a “Mt. St. Joseph”, where Smith crossed the Sierras in 1827. To the southeast, in the Great Basin, is a fragment of a river called the “Seeds Keeder,” Smith’s name for the Green. A short distance to the south is a second river with the legend “Rio de las Piramides Sulfuras problt. le Seeds Keeder de Smith.” Wheat notes this as “the first cartographic mention of the great explorer” by name (p. 144)

The map gives an excellent depiction of Texas on a large-scale on the eve of the Texas Revolution. A second edition was published by Charles Piquet in 1840. That edition made many changes to the geography of the west, including the elimination of Jedidiah Smith’s route, shown on this 1834 edition. Most of the changes were the result of an attempt to reconcile Smith’s information with John Arrowsmith’s 1834 map of British North America. The 1840 edition also added a great deal of new information for Texas, including new towns, roads, and altered geographical features. Both editions are among the best maps for Texas published in Europe in the period.

REFERENCES:

Not in Streeter; See Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi, 404.

Inventory No. 8588

Cohen & Taliaferro

*indicates required

Receive copies of our printed catalogs in the mail several times each year (U.S. residents only) and/or email updates to our on-line catalog every few weeks.

Cohen & Taliaferro LLC never sells, trades or gives away information from our mailing lists.

() -