ONE OF THE FINEST NINETEENTH CENTURY VIEWS OF A TEXAS TOWN

 

$24,500

INQUIRE ABOUT THIS ITEM HOW TO ORDER

AUTHOR:

KOCH, AUGUSTUS

TITLE:

Bird’s Eye View of New Braunfels Comal County Texas 1881

CONDITION:

18” x 28-1/2”. Color printed lithograph. Expertly remargined on the left and right-hand side, not affecting printed surface, lined. Overall a remarkably clean and fresh copy.

DATE:

[no publisher or place of publication noted]

DESCRIPTION:

An extremely rare aerial panorama of this important Texas town. In his masterwork on American bird’s eye views, John Reps surveyed the collections of over 200 American institutions and located a single copy of this view of New Braunfels, at the Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth.

The town of New Braunfels was established in 1844 as the administrative center for the Adelsverein, or German Emigration Company. The Company purchased significant tracts of land in the unsettled Texas Hill Country, and by April 1845 had brought over 5,000 German settlers. Named after Prince Carl of Solms-Braunfels, the Commissioner General of the Company, New Braunfels was located at the eastern edge of the Hill Country and was a transit point for settlers on their way west.

Augustus Koch was one of the leading makers of these views. Reps notes, that he “drew his cities with considerable care … [and] substantial accuracy.” The town, still little more than a village, is shown from the south, with the Comal River snaking diagonally across the landscape, Gruene beyond, and the Guadeloupe River near the horizon. In the far distance rises the chain of hills that marks the eastern edge of the Texas Hill Country.

Koch must have published the view to celebrate the arrival in 1880-81 of the International-Great Northern Railroad that connected the town to San Antonio and Austin. The railroad is prominently shown, with its depots for passenger and freight clearly identified in the key in the lower margin (nos. 6 and 7). Sophienburg (14), the first building erected by the German Emigration Company in 1845 as their headquarters, was destroyed in 1886. Several mills along the banks of the Comal are prominently shown, emphasizing the vigor and industrial advantages of the town, including (13) Comal Mills, now on the grounds of the Schlitterbahn Water Park. The old Guadeloupe Hotel (5) and numerous churches and public buildings are also identified.

REFERENCES:

Reps, Urban Views and Viewmakers, 3990; Reps, Cities on Stone, pp. 94-95.

Inventory No. 8712

Cohen & Taliaferro

*indicates required

Receive copies of our printed catalogs in the mail several times each year (U.S. residents only) and/or email updates to our on-line catalog every few weeks.

Cohen & Taliaferro LLC never sells, trades or gives away information from our mailing lists.

() -